University academics told classic books hurt their ‘well-being’

University academics told that classic books hurt their ‘well-being’ and urged to stop reading ‘uncomfortable’ content

  • Queen Mary University of London has a reading list for staff there
  • It includes fiction that educates them on equality, diversity and inclusion issues
  • Text reading list including To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Also comes with a content warning from HR

They were told to issue “trigger warnings” to protect undergraduates from certain course content, and academics are now being urged to stop reading “uncomfortable” content to protect their health.

Queen Mary University of London has provided staff with a reading list to educate them on issues of equality, diversity and inclusion.

It contains classic school textbooks such as Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s children’s book The Secret Garden.

The list also comes with a “Content Warning” from Human Resources, which states: “Some of the following books and resources may contain content and address sensitive issues that may be disturbing to some people.

“If you are uncomfortable with anything then please stop your activity and it is important that you take care of your health.”

The reading list contains classic school textbooks such as To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee and The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett for children

Other literature recommended for university staff include John Steinbeck’s Between Men and Mice, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick and Zadie Smith’s White Teeth.

Staff were also directed to some text about “whiteness, white vulnerability, and strength.” These include Reni Eddo-Lodge’s 2017 bestseller “Why I Stop Talking to White People About Race” and a book titled: The Sugar-Coated Language of White Vulnerability.

The move comes after many universities issued trigger warnings to undergraduates in humanities courses.

The Open University has issued a trigger warning for all but one of the texts studied in its ‘English Literature from Shakespeare to Austin’ module.

Meanwhile, the University of Warwick has warned undergraduates that Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Crowd depicts “the cruelty of nature” in its description of dying sheep.

At the University of Aberdeen, students were told they could opt out of discussions on modules on Geoffrey Chaucer and medieval writing, as the course “sometimes involves engaging with topics that you may find emotionally challenging”.

The move by Queen Mary has been criticised by True Education Campaign chairman Chris McGovern, who said the trigger warning was “going viral”.

“After spreading from students to lecturers, the ‘trigger warning’ virus is now very dangerous, infecting and impairing many aspects of daily life,” he said. “What’s next – warning for meat eaters, white males, motorists “Or is it already, too late? “

Meanwhile, the University of Warwick has warned undergraduates that Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Crowd depicts “the cruelty of nature” in its description of dying sheep.Pictured: Thomas Hardy

His criticism was echoed by Frank Freddy, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of Kent, who said: “Academia’s obsession with isolating people from sensitive issues has led to the gradual transformation of universities into clinics where students and staff are seen as having Potential Clinic.” Patient. ‘

“As trigger warnings normalize, reading itself is increasingly seen as a health risk,” he added.

A spokeswoman for Queen Mary University of London called the guidelines “historic” and said it would now be removed from the university’s website.

“The guidance is inconsistent with university policy,” she said.

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